Wednesday, 14 September 2016

How to reduce weight | 5 easy ways to add fruits and vegetables to dinner



How to reduce weight


 Our Diet Plan is aimed to reduce at least one to two kg weight in a week or maximum 2 to 4 kg a month to make sure healthy weight loss without compromising . Reducing weight too quickly can be risky on your mind as well as body that will make you experiences low, sick and drained. When you reduce a lot of weight in short time, you’re in fact losing mostly water as well as muscle instead of fats.
5 easy ways to add fruits and vegetables to dinner


Fruits and vegetables contain vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that are essential for good health. That’s one reason why a plant-based diet that includes lots of fruits and vegetables can lower your risk of developing life-threatening diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. And when you pile on the produce, there’s less room for the unhealthy foods, too.
Dinner is typically the largest (and latest) meal of the day, and it’s a good opportunity to make sure that you meet your daily quota for fruits and vegetables. Here are five easy ways to work more produce into dinner.
1.    Roast vegetables. Roasting is a great way to let the deep, rich flavors of vegetables shine through. Bake cut vegetables at 375° F for 20 to 25 minutes or until they’re lightly browned. You can roast any vegetable — from mushrooms, onions, eggplant, and zucchini to tomatoes, broccoli, and carrots — so don’t limit yourself. Enjoy roasted veggies as a side dish, or toss them into pasta dishes and other recipes.
2.    Poach veggies in low-sodium chicken broth and white wine. To poach, boil enough liquid to cover the vegetables. When it boils, add the vegetables. Turn down the heat to just below boiling and cook the vegetables for about five to seven minutes, until they’re brightly colored and tender-crisp. Add garlic, basil, or tarragon for a flavor bonus. To retain nutrients, keep a watchful eye on the pot or set a timer so you don’t overcook.
3.    Smuggle fresh-cut vegetables into main dishes. Try adding mushrooms, peppers, zucchini, onions, or carrots into pasta sauces, casseroles, soups, stews, scrambled eggs, and chili.
4.    Have a salad with dinner most days. Starting with a salad can help you consume fewer calories at the meal, as long as the salad is no more than 100 calories. A healthful salad consists of about 3 cups of dark-green leafy lettuce, 1⁄2 cup carrots, a tomato, 1⁄4 cucumber, and 1 1⁄2 tablespoons of low-calorie dressing. Try tossing in some petite peas, onions, celery, or peppers for an extra boost of nutrients.
5.    Choose fruit — fresh or frozen, stewed or baked — for dessert. It all counts toward your daily produce quota. Dried fruits are healthy but high in calories, so eat them sparingly.

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Diabetes Treatment

Above-normal blood sugar linked to dementia

There are many reasons to keep your blood sugar under control: protecting your arteries and nerves are two of them. Here’s another biggie: preventing dementia, the loss of memory and thinking skills that afflicts millions of older Americans.
A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that even in people without diabetes, above normal blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. This finding goes beyond previously seen links between diabetes and dementia. “It establishes for the first time, convincingly, that there is a link between dementia and elevated blood sugars in the non-diabetic range,” says study author Dr. David Nathan, a Harvard Medical School professor and the director of the Diabetes Center and Clinical Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Dr. Nathan teamed up with researchers across the country to look at blood sugar levels in more than 2,000 older adults—the average age was 76—taking part in the Adult Changes in Thought study. The vast majority of the study participants did not have diabetes. What the researchers found is that any incremental increase in blood sugar was associated with an increased risk of dementia—the higher the blood sugar, the higher the risk.
Why? There are only theories. “The speculation is that elevated blood sugar levels are causing more vascular disease, but it may be other metabolic issues. For example, people with elevated blood sugar often have insulin resistance which may be the link that affects our brain cells,” says Dr. Nathan.
The study does not prove that high blood sugar causes dementia, only that there is an association between the two. For that reason, don’t start trying to lower your blood sugar simply to preserve your thinking skills, cautions Dr. Nathan. There’s no evidence that strategy will work, although he says it should be studied.
But it is worth keeping an eye on your blood sugar to try to avoid developing type 2 diabetes. This disease is at epidemic proportions. Almost 26 million Americans—one in 12—have diabetes. High blood sugar is hallmark of this disease. Normal blood sugar is under 100 milligrams per deciliter of blood mg/dL after an eight-hour fast. You have diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 mg/dL or higher after a fast. People with a blood sugar reading of above 100 but below 126 have what’s called prediabetes. Nearly 80 million Americans are in that camp.
Excess blood sugar is a problem because it can lead to a variety of health problems including heart, eye, kidney, and nerve disease.

Taming blood sugar

What if your blood sugar is above normal? There’s good news in that department: You can lower your blood sugar by exercising and, if needed, losing weight. Shifting to a healthier diet with more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains and cutting back on highly refined grains can also help.
Try to get 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity activity, such as brisk walking. If that’s daunting, know that even a little activity can make a big difference in lowering blood sugar levels. Short but frequent walking breaks—as brief as a minute and forty seconds every half hour—can lower blood sugar. So can taking a walk after a meal.
And it doesn’t always have to be official “exercise.” Try taking the stairs more often, parking farther away from the store, and getting up and moving if you’ve been sitting too long. “It’s common sense,” says Dr. Nathan. “The more active you are and the less sedentary, the more likely it is that your muscles can uptake glucose, and the insulin you make will be more effective.”
Also helpful is cutting back your intake of highly refined carbohydrates, especially foods with added sugars such as sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, and also molasses, cane sugar, corn sweetener, raw sugar, syrup, honey or fruit juice concentrates. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories from sugar or six teaspoons of sugar per day for women, and 150 calories or nine teaspoons of sugar per day for men. If you’re in the predictable or diabetic range, you’ll want to work with a dietitian to determine your exact needs.
Making these changes is an investment, to be sure. But the payoff—better physical and mental health—is definitely worth it.

Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Breakfast Recipes – Protein Rich Food - Moong dal chutney (Pesara - pappu pachadi)


Moong dal chutney or we can say Pesara - pappu pachadi in Andhra style. It is easy to prepare; it didn’t need any oil for preparation. Moong dal chutney is totally oil free best for those who are looking to lose belly fat. Moong dal chutney is very delicious as well as super food too. It goes well with rice and chapatti. We can consider it as a side dish in breakfast recipes. The crunchy taste of moong dal and lime juice combination is awesome. It just melts in your mouth.
Main ingredients of Moong dal chutney recipe is Moong dal

  1.  Moong dal is very light and easy to digest. It is packed with nutrients such as proteins, fibers. Fibers helps to regulate the blood sugar level as well as it is the best food in diabetes treatment.
  2. In many weight loss diet plans such as GM Diet we give one bowl of moong dal, because its calorie count is very low and it is rich in fiber, which helps to keep you full for the longer period.
  3. It is also rich in Omega 3 fatty acids; it helps to reduce the cholesterol level(LDL) as well as it decreases the risk of high blood pressure.
  4. It is rich source of iron also prevents anemia.
  5. Moong dal is packed with antioxidants such as vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin C; it helps to prevents from many diseases.
  6. It is amazing food for skin also.
Health benefits of Moong dal chutney  

•    It is a protein rich food.
•    It is free from Transfats.
•    It is good source of omega 3 fatty acids.
•    Moong dal chutney is good source of dietary fibers.
•    It is good source of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, copper, phosphorus, zinc and other minerals.
Serving size- 5 to 8 persons
Total time (Preparation + cook)- 25 minutes
Shelf life – 2to3 days (store in refrigerator)
Moong dal–200gm
Lime - 3 no
Red chilli - 10 no
Hing (asafetida) - 2 pinch
Salt- as per taste

Method

  1.  Wash and soak moong dal in water (1.5 cup) for 20 minutes.
  2. After 20 minutes drain the water from moong dal.
  3. In food processor add moon dal, salt and hing. Grind it; make paste (not too smooth, coarse is ok).
  4. Pour it in a bowl, and squeeze lime on it, mix well.( instead of lime juice you can also add tamarind, remove the seeds and threads, while grinding add this tamarind with other ingredients )
  5. It goes well with hot steamed rice and dollop of ghee.
     


    Nutritional Information of Moong dal chutney (Pesara pappu pachadi) recipe
Energy kCal - 762.9,
Protein, gm - 50.6,
Carbohydrates, gm - 133.8,
Fat, gm - 2.9,
Dietary Fiber, gm - 16.4,
Vitamin A, mcg - 115.3,
Vitamin B1, mg - 1.0,
Vitamin B2, mg - 0.4,
Vitamin B3, mg - 5.3,
Vitamin B6, mg - 0.0,
Vitamin B9 Folic Acid, mcg - 280.0,
Vitamin B12, mcg - 0.0,
Vitamin C, mg - 2.5,
Vitamin D, mcg - 0.0,
Vitamin E, mg - 1.5,
Vitamin K, mcg - 0.0,
Calcium, mg - 448.9,
Phosphorus, mg - 853.0,
Iron, mg - 9.4
Magnesium, mg - 244.2,
Copper, mcg - 784.3,
Manganese, mg - 2.1,
Molybdenum, mcg - 892.0,
Zinc, mg - 5.6,
Chromium, mcg - 20.8,
Selenium, mcg - 0.0,
Omega 3, mg - 1206.0,
Omega 6, mg - 86.0